Apr 7, 2014

Top 3 Reasons Mixed Grain Fir is Better than CVG

By KC

Top 3 Reasons Mixed Grain Fir is Better than CVG

Here in the Pacific Northwest, CVG fir trim is everywhere.  It's been the standard for unpainted wood trim for decades, and for good reason: Fir offers a rich, warm look and consistent quality.

However, it  is not always the best choice.  We often recommend Mixed Grain fir trim as an alternative. Here are three good reasons why:

  1. More environmentally friendly -- CVG means Clear Vertical Grain, which is the same as quarter-sawn wood. This cut demans big, tall trees to yield long runs of trim without any knots -- which means that in most cases, when you buy CVG fir, you're buying old growth trees. Mixed grain trim can come from smaller diameter trees and still provide supreme quality.
  2. More interesting to look at -- Mixed grain offers varied patterns and organic flow, with no two pieces alike. It shows more of the character of the wood and offers far more visual interest than the uniform stripes of CVG.
  3. More cost effective -- Mixed Grain fir is less costly than CVG because it is a more efficient way to slice the logs.  Cutting logs into CVG results in a lot of waste that can't be used elsewhere, driving up the cost of the product.  Our Mixed Grain trim, clear and high-grade, is a much better buy than CVG.

We offer and recommend FSC Certified Mixed Grain fir as a stylish and more sustainable alternative to classic CVG fir trim. While Mixed Grain fir meshes effortlessly with modern spaces, it is also ideal for historic remodels and was used in many of the style-setting turn-of-the-century homes in the Pacific Northwest.

Our FSC Certified Mixed Grain fir trim is clear (C&Btr grade), kiln-dried, and locally sourced. We stock it in 4/4 and 5/4 thicknesses, with lengths of 8' through 16'.

It is ideal for window and door trim, thresholds, cabinetry, furniture, and other interior applications. We also provide custom-milled Mixed Grain paneling, flooring, and butcher blocks.

Contact us for current pricing and availability!

Photos at top and below: Mixed Grain fir provides the perfect look for this historic home, photographed by Craftsman Design and Renovation and Pete Eckert.
Photo at bottom: Mixed Grain fir pairs nicely with salvaged walnut for this modern custom art display by Urban Timberworks. 



 
Jul 3, 2013

A special partnership provides exceptional FSC lumber

By KC

A special partnership provides exceptional FSC lumber

Though we are supportive of all our local Forest Stewardship Council certified businesses, we feel that those who were FSC certified "before certification was cool" deserve special mention. The Collins Companies has been based in Portland since 1918. Operating 4 mills in the Pacific Northwest, this family-owned company has been an important member of our community for generations.  
 
Their commitment to place is matched by their commitment to sustainability: The Collins forests began implementing advanced sustainability practices nearly 100 years ago, and 20 years ago their forest and mill in Chester, CA became the very first to achieve FSC certification in North America.

The management of their forests has earned Collins accolades from groups including the Sierra Club, and the forests continue to provide habitat for a diverse number of species including Chinook salmon, black bears, beavers, mink and marmots, and many kinds of birds, reptiles and amphibians.  

Like an oenophile waiting for special vintages, Sustainable Northwest Wood snatches up Douglas Fir lumber from Collins mills as often as we can.

The load of beautiful wane-free "Appearance Grade" lumber that just arrived at our warehouse demonstrates that quality, sustainability, and fair pricing can all come in the same package.

This month we're pleased to announce that our FSC lumber priced are considerably lower than the highs hit earlier this year.  Be sure to contact us about bidding your next project with FSC wood!

Photo at top: Collins' Almanor forest is home to a diverse range of plant and animal species.

Photo at right: The Collins lumber mill in Chester, CA sits on the shore of Lake Almanor. This mill and the forest that surrounds it were the first to achieve FSC certification in North America.

 
Nov 5, 2012

A Special Harvest for the Ace Hotel

By KC

A Special Harvest for the Ace Hotel

One of the reasons the Ace Hotel is so enduringly cool is its commitment to sustainability. Case in point: The enhancements being made to guest rooms in the downtown Portland hotel.

Custom woodwork is being crafted in-house to add texture and warmth--and a little storage and privacy--to the rooms.  
 
The folks at the Ace are using fir that is locally harvested and FSC 100%, but its story goes much deeper than that: It is part of an oak grove restoration project being undertaken by Sarah Deumling at Zena Forest, just west of Salem.

 The fir is being cleared from the forest to allow neighboring oak trees to grow to their full potential.  The fir and the oak took root at the same time, about 50 to 60 years ago, when the cleared pasture was allowed to revert back to its preferred wooded state. Fir grows much faster than oak, however, and the fir trees are shading out the oaks and, ultimately, killing them.

By selectively harvesting the fir and leaving the oaks to grow, Deumling is ensuring a continual supply of valuable hardwood lumber for her family to mill decades down the road while preserving endangered oak habitat -- a far-sighted plan that is far too uncommon in forest management.

In true Zena style, the harvest of the fir is being undertaken with the utmost care. Logs are pulled from the woods in a way that minimizes damage to the understory and deliberately preserves the integrity of the soil.

As the logging progresses, the forest canopy opens up, allowing ample rays of sunlight to reach the oaks for the first time in decades (see photo at left). And with the exception of the scattered stumps remaining in the soil, it is hard to tell that logging has even occurred: The forest is still lush, green, and rife with life.

A Bit About Oak
Oregon White Oak is native to the Willamette Valley and historically was the most common species of tree found in the area. It prefers the open grassland savannahs that were cultivated by Native Americans with frequent-but-small fires.

After settlement, however, oak began to decline as groves were cleared to make way for pasture and cropland, and then plantations of Douglas fir. Today it remains in only about 5% of its historical range. Its current biggest threat is the conversion of woodland to other land uses including vineyards and housing developments.

Oregon White Oak's hardwood is beautiful and durable, but Oregonians have had a preference for importing oak from the East Coast for flooring and furniture. As a result, the millions of local oak trees cleared during the conversion of the native forest to more profitable uses resulted in oak being viewed as a "trash tree," and most frequently "dumped down the canyon," as the local saying goes, or sent to chip yards.

 Zena Forest and other modern-day pioneers of sustainable forestry are working to change that view and encourage the cultivation and local use of Oregon White Oak.  Through the creation of a market for the wood, foresters and landowners in the Willamette Valley are encouraged to preserve existing trees and plant new ones.

Photo at right: A mature Oregon White Oak stretches its limbs in the sun at Zena Forest.
 

 

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225A SE Division Place
Portland, Oregon 97202
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