Blog

Oct 02 2013

A Story of Salvation: Big Leaf Maple Live-Edge Slabs

By KC

Our live-edge maple slabs are remarkable not just for their size and their beautiful grain patterns, but also for the way in which they come to us:

Generally cut and left as collateral damage from agricultural or timber harvest operations, these maple logs are too big to go to a regular lumber mill.  In our post-old growth era, most sawmills have been sized for smaller diameter trees, and logs measuring 20" or more across are simply too big for most mills to bother with. 
 
Instead, these grand trees end up at pulp yards, where the incredible grain patterns, impressive sizes, and rich history of these trees become fodder for the paper-making process.  Yes, that's right: these mighty old hardwoods are on the path to becoming paper.

Luckily, our sawyer stalks the pulp yards and rescues the biggest and most beautiful logs, then saws them up into unique and beautiful live-edge slabs, diverting this valuable wood from the waste stream. 
 
These big leaf maple slabs have the warm, rich color for which this species is known, with incredible luster and frequent quilting, curl, and other special grain patterns.

We stock 10/4 live-edge maple slabs in a variety of widths and lengths, each with its own one-of-a-kind grain pattern and edge detail.  We can also provide custom sizes for special projects.

Visit our warehouse today and pick out the slab for your special project!

Photo above left: This giant hardwood log is saved from destruction at a pulp yard in the Willamette Valley.

Photo above right: A 36" diameter big leaf maple log awaits the saw and kiln after its rescue from the pulp mill. Many of our slabs still have their moss clinging to the live edges.


Above: Big leaf maple slabs are used extensively throughout the new Danner Boot store at Union Way in Portland.

Above: This one-of-a-kind coffee table by Portland woodworker and carpenter Paul Johnson shows off the exceptional grain patterns for which maple is known.

Above: A transparent stain adds depth and sophistication to this conference table, built by Windfall Lumber.